Maybelle D. Payne

Allergic reactions to the coronavirus vaccine are rare and outweighed by the benefit of protection, CDC finds

Given the small risk of severe allergic reaction and its treatable nature, the risk of catching the coronavirus and becoming severely ill or dying far outweighs that of a potential allergic reaction, CDC officials said.

The virus is killing roughly 2,670 people every day — an average that continues to rise, according to statistics compiled by The Washington Post.

“The known and potential benefits outweigh the known and potential risk of getting vaccine,” Nancy Messonnier, director of the CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, said in a news briefing. Messonnier said CDC officials are worried about people being reluctant to be vaccinated — including health-care workers who were in the first-priority group for vaccinations.

Messonnier highlighted the rigorous approval process the vaccines underwent to be proved safe and effective. The two authorized vaccines — from Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna — are “very safe” and severe allergic reactions are “still

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‘Look for a new roommate’

A woman is feuding with her roommate over apartment decorations. 

She went on Reddit’s “Am I the A******” forum to share a recent argument. When the roommate’s parents were visiting, the roommate asked for a major favor. 

“My roommate said that her parents were gonna come down for the holidays,” the user wrote. “I was completely okay with that, I was going to my parents for the holidays so I didn’t mind at all. Until she told me I had to take the decorations down in my room. I have pride flags, some provocative posters, witchy stuff, among other things in my room. I didn’t see why and she said it was because her parents are very conservative. I told her that it was my room, I will keep my door closed and why would her parents be in my room anyway?”

The roommate insisted that her

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Congress Approves New Smithsonian Museums Celebrating Latinx People and Women’s History

Illustration for article titled Congress Approves New Smithsonian Museums Celebrating Latinx People and Womens History

Photo: PRESTON KERES/AFP (Getty Images)

The $900 billion covid-19 relief bill and end-of-year spending package, which Congress passed on Monday, also greenlit the creation of two new Smithsonian museums, one dedicated to Latinx people and the other dedicated to women’s history in the United States.

In order to build a new museum, the Smithsonian must be granted permission through federal legislation. Similar to the financing of the National Museum of African American History & Culture, the most recently created Smithsonian, the bill requires that the funding and costs for the projects be taken equally from public and private sources. Although several spots are already being scoped out, the Smithsonian Board of Regents is responsible for finding space for both new museums on or near the National Mall.

The president of the Friends of the American Latino Museum, Estuardo Rodriguez, said it was fitting that

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‘Wonder Woman 1984’ debuts with pandemic-best $16.7M

NEW YORK (AP) — Despite premiering simultaneously by streaming service, “Wonder Woman 1984” managed the best box office debut of the pandemic, opening with $16.7 million over the Christmas weekend, according to studio estimates Sunday.

That’s only a faint glimmer of typical business during the holiday season, when cinemas are usually packed and box-office receipts are among the best of the year. Last year, “Star Wars: Rise of Skywalker” exceeded $32 million on Christmas Day alone. According to data firm Comscore, 35% of North American theaters are currently open.

But Warner Bros. nevertheless celebrated the performance of “Wonder Woman 1984,” which landed in 2,150 theaters and bettered the approximately $10 million launch of Warner Bros.’ “Tenet” in North America. (Universal Pictures’ “The Croods: A New Age” opened similarly in late November.) “Wonder Woman 1984” grossed an additional $19.4 million in international markets where it began playing a week earlier. The

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Illinois woman finds apparent COVID test in Kohl’s package


CHICAGO (AP)

An Illinois woman who ordered flags for her grandmother’s garden got a surprise when the package arrived — someone’s apparent COVID-19 test specimen.

Andrea Ellis was wrapping Christmas gifts at her aunt’s house in East Moline, in northwestern Illinois, when she opened a padded envelope containing the flags she ordered weeks ago from the department store chain Kohl’s, according to The Quad City Times.

“I pulled out the flags and I told my aunt, ‘Look how cute these are,’” she said. “I pulled out the packing slip and then noticed something deeper inside the envelope and pulled that out. It was a biohazard bag containing someone’s COVID-19 test specimen.”

Ellis, who didn’t immediately reply to a Monday phone message from The Associated Press, called the police, who referred the issue to the county health department, according to East Moline police Chief Jeff Ramsey.

Janet Hill, the

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Billionaire Leonard Lauder reveals successful people are first to arrive at work, last to leave

Estée Lauder Chairman Emeritus and cosmetics billionaire Leonard Lauder told Fox Business Network Tuesday that being successful is all about the time put in and knowing firsthand that there’s no substitute for hard work.

Leonard Lauder, the eldest son of Estée and Joseph Lauder, told “Cavuto: Coast to Coast” that his father consistently beat him to the office and was last to return home.

“A bit of advice that I’d give to all young people: Never come in late,” he said. “Be the first there and, if you can, be the last to leave. First there and last to leave always gets it.”

HOW CORONAVIRUS IS CHANGING THE FACE OF THE BEAUTY INDUSTRY

Leonard Lauder joined the family business in 1958, taking over as president in 1972 and becoming CEO

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