Black

Viola Davis makes history as most Oscar-nominated Black actress

This year’s nod for ‘Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom’ marks her fourth nomination with one win for ‘Fences’ in 2017

Viola Davis continues to make history.

Read More: Viola Davis shows off curly afro for Critics’ Choice Awards

On Monday it was announced Davis became the most nominated Black woman in Oscar history, according to Netflix, with four nods. Davis’ latest nomination for her role in Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom broke her tie with Octavia Spencer who has three nominations and one win.

LOréal Paris Celebrates The Launch of Age Perfect Cosmetics

Viola Davis joins LOréal Paris to celebrate the launch of Age Perfect Cosmetics on March 03, 2020. (Photo by Rachel Murray/Getty Images for L’Oréal Paris )

Davis took home an Oscar for Best Supporting Actress for her role in Fences back in 2017. The Ma Rainey star has solidified her spot in Hollywood history but is known for candidly discussing the lack of opportunities for Black women

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Unsun Cosmetics Chosen to Share Its Brand Story With Millions on QVC, HSN, and Zulily During Black History Month

CALABASAS, CA / ACCESSWIRE / February 9, 2021 / Unsun Cosmetics has been selected for Qurate Retail Group’s Small Business Spotlight, a collaboration with the National Retail Federation (NRF) Foundation to strengthen diverse small businesses through increased exposure and various other pro bono in-kind services. The program, which will run throughout 2021, builds on Qurate Retail Group’s longstanding foundation of supporting small businesses and reflects the company’s and NRF Foundation’s commitment to increasing opportunities for underrepresented groups.

Qurate Retail Group, a multiplatform retailer that includes QVC, HSN, Zulily, and several other brands, is using its production resources, television broadcasts, and digital platforms to help Unsun Cosmetics share its story with millions of consumers nationwide. Unsun Cosmetics’ story began appearing on QVC’s and HSN’s websites and social pages in early 2021 and the company will be highlighted on air on Feb. 12, 2021, at 12 p.m. and 9 p.m. ET on

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Kamala Harris elevates black designers on world stage

<span>Photograph: Melina Mara/AP</span>
Photograph: Melina Mara/AP

In a year where the global fashion industry has faced its biggest ever racial reckoning Kamala Harris, the first black and south Asian vice-president, has elevated the names of black designers by wearing their clothes on the biggest public stage possible.

Related: Biden and Harris dress to reassure that normal service is restored

By wearing fashion labels Pyer Moss, Christopher John Rogers and Sergio Hudson during last week’s inauguration events, Harris was aligning the new administration’s commitment to diversity with the fashion industry’s attempt to move past systemic, historic racism into a new era. A new era where designers of color get the same opportunities that their white counterparts have had for years.

“When it comes to inauguration events, black designers have been almost exclusively absent,” said the author Ronda Racha Penrice, “so it was nice to discover that the fabulous outfits [were] created by black designers.”

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Icon Beverly Johnson Reveals a Pool Was Once Drained After a Fashion Shoot Because She’s Black

Supermodel Beverly Johnson made history when she appeared on the cover of Vogue in 1974, becoming the first Black woman to do so. But over four decades later, the 67-year-old pioneer, who grew up in Buffalo, New York, says there’s still much that needs to be addressed in the fashion industry and beyond. This is her story, as told to PEOPLE.

The first time I ever experienced racism, I was 12 or 13. We were riding our bikes in a white neighborhood and all the kids started throwing pop bottles at us. I heard them call us the N-word. That was the first time I really heard it. It really chipped away a little piece of my heart, but it also made me more determined.

When I started my modeling career in the 1970s, I wanted the top modeling agent. That was Eileen Ford. She said, “You’ll never be on

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Woman apologises for telling man he was illegally defacing his own home with ‘Black Lives Matter’ slogan

James Juanillo chalked 'Black Lives Matter' on his own wall – and was accused of illegal action by someone who assumed he didn't live there: AP
James Juanillo chalked ‘Black Lives Matter’ on his own wall – and was accused of illegal action by someone who assumed he didn’t live there: AP

A San Francisco woman who questioned a man writing “Black Lives Matter” on his own home has apologised for assuming he did not live there and calling the police on him.

“I want to apologise directly to Mr Juanillo,” Ms Alexander said in a statement. “There are not enough words to describe how truly sorry I am for being disrespectful to him last Tuesday when I made the decision to question him about what he was doing in front of his home. I should have minded my own business.”

In the video, shot by James Juanillo on his phone, Ms Alexander is seen asking Mr Juanillo, who is Filipino, whether he lives in the house, saying that he is defacing private property

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