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Here’s What It Takes For Fashion Brands To Be Sustainable. Can The Industry Be Saved?

This story was originally published on September 25, 2020.

By now, the fashion industry’s harmful effects on the environment are well-known. With natural resources being used faster than they can be renewed, and more clothing produced by brands (and thrown out by consumers) than ever before, the environmental impact of the industry, as it currently operates, is catastrophic. “In the U.S., 11 million tons of textiles go into landfills every year,” says Kristy Caylor, CEO and co-founder of For Days, a zero-waste, organic line of basics. “When these clothes decompose, they release methane which is more harmful than CO2.”

With this in mind, many fashion brands have been reconsidering their practices over the last few years. In 2015, Mara Hoffman, the founder of the eponymous fashion brand, made a turn for the sustainable. “The switch was prompted by discomfort. When I started to learn about the fashion industry’s

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Here’s My Top Growth Stock to Buy Right Now

Every investor wants a stock that can grow faster than the broad market, but this outperformance isn’t always easy to find. Let’s explore how Revolve Group (NYSE:RVLV) can use its innovative business model to disrupt the fashion industry to boost its revenue and earnings. 

A fashion retail disruptor 

Founded in 2003, Revolve Group boasts a unique take on fashion retail. The company curates and sells designer apparel, footwear, and accessories with the help of a proprietary algorithm to manage inventory and tap into fashion trends. But its marketing strategy — which relies on a network of about 4,500 Instagram influencers — is what sets it apart from competitors in the industry. 

Well dressed woman throwing cash

Image source: Getty Images.

Instead of traditional advertising such display ads, billboards, etc., Revolve pampers its social media influencers with free clothes and exclusive experiences to help them create engaging social media content. As just one example,

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Unused makeup attracts bacteria. Here’s what to toss or clean

When one of Noëlle Sherber’s patients came to see her several months ago, the Washington, D.C., dermatologist noticed that the woman had an eye infection. It was a small sty and easily treatable, but Sherber still wanted to know what caused it.

Sherber learned that the patient, who had been at home since mid-March, had recently put on a full face of makeup using products that largely had sat untouched for months after she, like many others, scaled back her usual beauty routine during the coronavirus pandemic.

“I asked, ‘How old is your mascara? Your eyeliner?’ ” said Sherber, a fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology and co-founder of Sherber and Rad. The woman, Sherber noted, had not purchased new cosmetics in a while and seemed to think that because she was not using her eye makeup often that it “extended the life span of the product.”

Even though

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