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Here’s the Real Story Behind the Battle of Versailles Fashion Show in ‘Halston’

No matter the decade, us hardcore fashion enthusiasts are familiar with one saying: any drama surrounding the latest trends is always good drama. Ryan Murphy is especially aware of this mantra, as his new Netflix miniseries Halston follows the rise and fall of the legendary 1970s fashion designer Roy Halston.

Aside from creating some fabulous statement pieces over the years, Halston was also famous for a fateful night in November 1973: The Battle of Versailles. Before you ask whether it was a war you might not have paid attention to in your high school history class… it kinda was. Pitting high-profile French designers against luxury American designers, it was a campaign to see who could best capture the scope of world fashion, and who would be remembered for it.

TL:DR—it was a night full of breathtaking pieces of clothing, with tons of historic moments to boot. Here’s a little breakdown

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Opinion | D.C. once had an Indigenous queen, Cockacoeske, the Queen of Pamunkey. Remember her story.

D.C. once had an Indigenous queen. Her name was Cockacoeske, the Queen of Pamunkey. She lived from 1610 to 1686. During that time, area tribal leaders attended an intertribal “caucus” convened at the site of today’s Capitol Hill, where they met to establish mutually beneficial tribal rights. Powhatan, the paramount chief of the Powhatan Paramountcy (and the father of Pocahontas), was known to have attended the caucus gatherings in his lifetime. Queen Cockacoeske was denied the opportunity to attend caucus gatherings because of increased violence from English settlers.

Queen Cockacoeske also had extended kin in the area. One of Powhatan’s wives was a Tauxenent Indian female. Their son was named Taux Powhatan to honor her. He and Pocahontas were half-siblings. Queen Cockacoeske’s father was Opechancanough, Powhatan’s brother. Although Queen Cockacoeske had a son named John West, he wasn’t qualified to be paramount chief because of Pamunkey tradition. Queen

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Unsun Cosmetics Chosen to Share Its Brand Story With Millions on QVC, HSN, and Zulily During Black History Month

CALABASAS, CA / ACCESSWIRE / February 9, 2021 / Unsun Cosmetics has been selected for Qurate Retail Group’s Small Business Spotlight, a collaboration with the National Retail Federation (NRF) Foundation to strengthen diverse small businesses through increased exposure and various other pro bono in-kind services. The program, which will run throughout 2021, builds on Qurate Retail Group’s longstanding foundation of supporting small businesses and reflects the company’s and NRF Foundation’s commitment to increasing opportunities for underrepresented groups.

Qurate Retail Group, a multiplatform retailer that includes QVC, HSN, Zulily, and several other brands, is using its production resources, television broadcasts, and digital platforms to help Unsun Cosmetics share its story with millions of consumers nationwide. Unsun Cosmetics’ story began appearing on QVC’s and HSN’s websites and social pages in early 2021 and the company will be highlighted on air on Feb. 12, 2021, at 12 p.m. and 9 p.m. ET on

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The True Story of Princess Margaret’s Bathtub Tiara

Photo credit: YouTube/Netflix
Photo credit: YouTube/Netflix

From Town & Country

I’ve always had a soft spot for Princess Margaret—partly for the same reason President Johnson so enjoyed her (those limericks!), but also because she had a killer eye for jewelry. So let’s call this my own contribution to what episode two of season three of The Crown refers to as “Margaretology.”

One of Margaret’s favorite pieces was her Poltimore tiara, which, though in size and shape and splendor every inch a royal-worthy jewel, still holds some of Princess Margaret’s independent spirit. It did not come out of the monarch’s vault for Margaret’s use, but rather belonged to the Princess herself.

Legend has it Margaret bought the tiara, but there is actually some debate about that fact: “It was purchased for her at auction in January 1959. It is not absolutely clear whether Margaret, her sister the Queen, or her mother actually paid for

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